Being forced to slow down

It’s frustrating to have an injury, isn’t it?

But it’s a humbling experience. We may have plans for our bodies, but our bodies often have different plans.

I was doing well, gaining strength and mobility in my Ashtanga practice. I had been working on jump backs and jump throughs, trying to build strength in my arms to lift my off the mat so my legs could shoot back. I also had been working on stage 1 of handstand that I learned in my Bheemashakti training.

Then this:

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That is from a tiny, tiny mole removal, lol! The doctor needed to go long in order to seam it up, since she had to take out a circle of skin and you can’t really stitch up a circle.

Doctor’s orders were no exercise for a week, no lifting over 10 pounds, and certainly no yoga.

After a couple of days I practiced asanas that didn’t require weight on my arms or arm extensions. But even in trikonasana I could feel the skin of my arm stretch, so I didn’t want to do much of that.

Later in the week I did some modifications. One week after the excision, I was back to a fairly normal Ashtanga practice, though with knees down during chaturanga. I also was back to practicing jump backs and jump throughs, so I was glad to only have a week off from that.

My goal asana for this summer, bhujapidasana, is going to have to wait a while longer! My arm is not going to like my leg resting on it!

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And starting next week I’ll be doing a Mysore practice once a week at OneYoga in Minneapolis, so I anticipate being a little weaker for that than I had hoped.

At times we need to take a step back and rest. Our bodies are good at telling us when to do that. Are we so good at listening, though?

 

 

Toe meets wall. Wall wins.

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I fractured the proximinal phalanx of my big toe nice and good. 

The doctor comes back into the room, holding a couple of foot boots. I’ve seen people wearing those boots. I haven’t envied them.

He’s a resident doctor, young and chipper and smiley. “You want to see your X-rays?”

“Sure.” I grimace. “Did I break my toe?”

Without skipping a beat, he says, “Oh yeah!” and chuckles.

That’s what I thought.

All day I’ve been thinking, do I tell people how I broke my big toe? I mean, my whole goal is to get people to try yoga. Yoga is supposed to be healing. Breaking a bone while DOING yoga is the opposite of that!

But hey, even the things we love to do aren’t always sunshine and unicorns.

I was up in headstand this morning. My headstands have been strong and steady. For many weeks, I haven’t even put my mat near a wall. I’ve been going up rather easily and if I ever feel off-balance, it’s only for a split second.

Today I went up, held it for eight breaths, came down into half-pike for a couple of breaths, and then went back up. Maybe I went up too fast. Maybe my mind wandered. As soon as I went up for the second round of breaths, that’s when I went straight over.

This was actually the first time I’ve fallen in headstand. I’ve feared this day. My first thought was, “My neck! Gotta protect my neck!” Honestly, I was surprised at how easily my body rolled over, how instinctually I took care of my neck and shoulders.

But my toe…

It smacked right into the wall. I’ve been practicing in a small space in our very cluttered basement, only because it’s warm and in the depths of a Minnesota winter my yoga room/porch is out of the question. I feel a little “off” in that basement space anyway, but until today I’d been making it work.

The next 4-6 weeks will be about adjustment. I will not be able to do a traditional Ashtanga practice. I will only be able to do asanas that allow for a flat foot. No down dogs, no jumping forward (and I was just starting to get the hang of that!). But there are a lot of asanas in the sequence that I will be able to do, so I will have to map that out.

I won’t be able to run or walk on the treadmill. But I should still be able to bike or do the elliptical. I was given the option of wearing the boot or wearing shoes with a sturdy sole, so at least I can still wear my normal shoes and tennis shoes.

This is a setback, but it could be so much worse. I could have hurt my neck. I could have cracked my ankle. I could be training for a running event and have to cancel it. I will miss not be able to snowshoe or go for a nice snowy run or walk at my favorite park, especially now when we have tons of snow.

What kind of setbacks have you encountered? How did you work through the setback?