What I wish I had known when I started my yoga journey: Part I

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The many benefits of yoga can be represented by a chart like this. The physical benefits are only a small slice.

This is the first in a series of blog posts in which I will explain what I wish I had known about yoga — specifically, Ashtanga yoga — when I started my journey nearly 20 years ago.

I will start with what I wished I had known about the benefits of yoga.

I entered yoga for the purely physical benefits. I was a runner when I started going to yoga classes, and I wanted the deep stretching that yoga provided. I went to class when I felt like I needed it, physically. This meant that sometimes I would go each week, but there were times when it was more like every other week, or at times I’d even take a long break from it, like over summer.

I was always glad I went because I felt better after each class. I was less injury-prone when I went to yoga class regularly.

But by focusing just on the physical, I was missing out on the other benefits. What yoga brings to your physical body is only a small slice of the pie. It’s only the shell, a skeleton without muscles, skin, or clothes, or a building that only has the foundation.

I was experiencing the other benefits, but my mind was closed to what was happening. I could feel something. I came home from Ashtanga with renewed energy. I knew I only wanted to put good things in my body after practice and would eat a small, healthy meal. Since class was in the evening, the energy affected my sleep. I’d wake up in the middle of the night, not exhausted or tired, but with that good energy flowing through my body. I described it as “zingy.” I could feel these things, but I didn’t know what it was. I knew yoga was the reason for the experiences, but I didn’t know why or how.

I also could not articulate the benefits of community, though the community was a reason why I enjoyed going to Ashtanga class. The class had a steady cast of characters — some were there almost every week, but others would rotate in and out. To this day, I can remember the group that I first started with back in 2002 or 2003. Many of the people whom I practiced with in the last 10 or 15 years are ones who now come to my class. These are lovely, lovely people, to a one. In this world, any time you can be around lovely people you need to cherish that and realize what a gift that is. I took it for granted when I first started my practice; I don’t take it for granted anymore.

It took my 200-hour yoga teacher training to help me realize that my yoga practice was far more than just physical. I learned about chakras and energy and how to live a life that’s consistent with your yoga practice. I’m not saying that everyone has to go through yoga teacher training to learn these things; just be open to what is happening to you beyond the physical when you practice yoga. 

Next: Creating a regular routine

 

 

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